Never Do This While Recruiting QA Engineers, Or Else…

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Interviewing people is hard. You, as a business owner, or any of your representatives in terms or recruitment (HR managers) aim to know as much about the candidate as possible. And such a task is complicated even further due the very nature of both CV’s and verbal interviews may grow from uninformative to deceiving. One more challenge is that you wish to interview a QA engineer, a person with technical skills you can only measure by testing them in the field.

Morals and ethics

Ethical dilemmas become one more vital part of this equation. There are aspects of both recruitment and interviews that are not regulated by laws and are being accepted on individual basis only. And still such things may be white or black, good or evil, right or wrong. Gray shades fueled by hypocrisy may hide the truth for a while and deliver several questionable, debatable benefits of this or that example of unethical behavior. However this will not last forever.

The don’ts

  • Never fish for ideas. Many companies tend to ask testers about their opinion on certain matters and expect solutions to truly complex matters. Hitting two birds with one stone may indeed sound delightful but no tester should invest his time, experience and ideas in free labor. Such activities are usually quite obvious and leave a negative trigger that shouts alarms every time your brand name is mentioned in certain circles. You will be forced to use tests in order to get some info about candidates, just make sure tests have nothing more behind them.
  • Do not intimidate candidates. Interviews where entire teams of QA and developers gather around one potential engineer, guide him towards a blackboard and testing is done in such a form. Why? Most IT people do not like unfamiliar crowds, add pressure of a job interview and you will get one tester with a nervous breakdown with no reason for it whatsoever.

Judging from experience both these activities scare off potential professionals and leave businesses with only those who still don’t know how to say no when necessary, a skill no great QA engineer may skip.