I Ain’t Scared Of No Numbers Or What May Discourage While Building A Testing Lab

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Wow, that is a lot of zeroes!

Have you ever considered making a Mobile Device Testing Lab? It might seem as a nice business with potential of paying your bills and helping people. But if the idea was occurring in your mind you were bond to dig up more information on the subject matter.

You have probably found lot’s of data and some of those numbers might actually seem discouraging. Just imagine there are 2.500 + different devices running on 100 + operation system versions that are serviced by 650 + carriers. That means a lot of devices to be included, right? This means that if the original goal will be testing every single possible permutation any test case will be run 189.121.172 times. That’s a lot!

Is it even possible?

Well, modern science tends to prove there is no such thing as ‘impossible’. The same may easily be applied in the world of software and in the testing domain especially. Yet there are still things that do seem unlikely. Sure there are lots of claims from various cloud service providers that are seemingly solving this issue with, as they say, ‘thousands’ of devices available for use. But, if that left apart, I might say it’s unlikely for any enterprise to achieve such a goal as primo: there is no possibility of being able of simply swapping devices every 24 hours if needed, and secundo: while the app is under test it’s of zero use to both users and employees.

What is the purpose of a Device Lab?

It’s all about devices is it not? Sure testing an app on all devices possible would be amazing yet nobody has limitless resources and devices themselves as well as new OS’s are popping out of thin air these days. Thus there has to be a balance between targeted devices and the cost as well as duration of testing. Targeting the right device population of devices in your lab ought to do the trick and you will have your share of people hungry for your services.

Plus a large amount of mobile OS’s are actually using logical screen sizes that are mapped to actual physical screens. Thus throwing in a nice set for every CPU architecture has to do the trick.